10 Places to Explore at Historic Jamestowne in Virginia

Part of the Colonial National Historic Park (one of the first parks, created in 1930) Historic Jamestowne honors the British Colonist experience in North America. The park includes a 23 mile scenic parkway that connects Yorktown Battlefield and Historic Jamestown. Both Yorktown and Jamestown have Visitor Centers with museums, outdoor activities, and many ranger led programs. Historic Jamestowne also includes archaeological sites, churches, and monuments honoring important historical figures.

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10 Family Friendly Things to Do in Fredericksburg, VA

Located an hour south of Washington DC and an hour north of the state capitol Richmond, Fredericksburg began as a tobacco seaport until the Civil War, when, in December of 1862, the area became synonymous with a battle that took the lives of 12, 000 thousands soldiers. Today, visitors come for an education in Revolutionary War and Civil War history and a chance to explore the numerous museums and historical sites. 

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The Old State House & the Boston National Historical Park

The Old State House, built in 1713, is the oldest building in Boston. It has been restored several times since it was saved by demolition in 1881. In addition to being the State House, the building also served as City Hall in the mid 1800s.  It's famous for overlooking the Boston Massacre and being the site of the first reading of the Declaration of Independence in Boston. In 1903 a branch of the subway was installed. 

With your admission ticket, each guest receives a lanyard and card and assigned historical figure from the Revolution Era. Each card includes biographical information, social rank, and age. Use this information at several exhibits throughout the museum.

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Playing ‘I Spy” in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, a town of less than 10,000 people, is the site of the largest Civil War battle ever fought, lasting three days in early July 1863. Over 51,000 soldiers were captured, wounded, or killed. The Battle is considered the turning point of the American Civil War, as the Union won the battle over Robert E. Lee and the Confederate army.

Each year, over three million people visit Gettysburg to learn about American history; to explore the museums, shops, and restaurants; and to enjoy the outdoors- there are over 31 miles of hiking trails. Many locations around town honor the people who fought in the battle and the civilians who supported them during and after the battle. The town also has strong ties to former Presidents Lincoln and Eisenhower.

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Eisenhower National Historic Site in Gettysburg, PA

Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was Supreme Allied Commander, war general, president of Columbia University and ultimately 34th president of the United States, lived in over 40 different homes before finally retiring in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in 1961. Eisenhower studied the Civil War and had spent time training soldiers at Camp Colt in Gettysburg during World War I. Eisenhower and his wife, Mamie, purchased the 187 acre complex in 1950 and used the home as a “weekend White House” and for an extended time when Eisenhower recovered from a heart attack in 1955. The Eisenhower National Historic Site, now part of the Gettysburg National Military Park, has been open to visitors since 1980 and almost every artifact in the home is authentic to the Eisenhower family. The home reflects the everyday living of the Eisenhower family in the 1950s and 1960s.

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