The Old State House & the Boston National Historical Park

The Old State House, built in 1713, is the oldest building in Boston. It has been restored several times since it was saved by demolition in 1881. In addition to being the State House, the building also served as City Hall in the mid 1800s.  It's famous for overlooking the Boston Massacre and being the site of the first reading of the Declaration of Independence in Boston. In 1903 a branch of the subway was installed. 

With your admission ticket, each guest receives a lanyard and card and assigned historical figure from the Revolution Era. Each card includes biographical information, social rank, and age. Use this information at several exhibits throughout the museum.

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Whydah Pirate Museum In West Yarmouth MA

Opened in June of 2016, the Whydah Pirate Museum showcases the ruins of the Whydah ship and the only full pirate treasure ever discovered in the world. The Whydah, a slave ship eventually overtaken by pirates, was built in 1715 in London and sailed to West Africa before heading to America. Captured by Sam Bellamy and fellow pirates, a Nor’Easter sank the ship off the shores of Cape Cod during the early morning hours of April 27, 1717. Only 2 of the 146 men (130 pirates and 16 prisoners) on the ship survived. 

In 1984, Barry Clifford discovered the wreckage off the coast of Wellsfleet, Massachusetts. Archaeologists and divers search through the wreckage between June and October each year searching for more treasures and bring artifacts back to the lab for cleaning, preservation, and display at the museum. 

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Playing ‘I Spy” in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, a town of less than 10,000 people, is the site of the largest Civil War battle ever fought, lasting three days in early July 1863. Over 51,000 soldiers were captured, wounded, or killed. The Battle is considered the turning point of the American Civil War, as the Union won the battle over Robert E. Lee and the Confederate army.

Each year, over three million people visit Gettysburg to learn about American history; to explore the museums, shops, and restaurants; and to enjoy the outdoors- there are over 31 miles of hiking trails. Many locations around town honor the people who fought in the battle and the civilians who supported them during and after the battle. The town also has strong ties to former Presidents Lincoln and Eisenhower.

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Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage in Nashville, Tennessee

Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage was the exclusive property of Andrew and his wife Rachel. He lived there from 1804 until his death in 1845. It was bought by a nonprofit organization in 1889 and opened later that year as a museum in his honor. Almost every artifact in the mansion is authentic. The property averages about 600-700 visitors each day, but when we were there, a docent said it had been one of the busiest days of the summer, with over 1,000 visitors by mid afternoon.

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10 Ways to Explore Roger Williams Park in Providence, Rhode Island

When I was planning a trip to Providence, Rhode Island, the Roger Williams Zoo was at the top of my list of places to explore. My family recently enjoyed a few days exploring downtown Providence and you can read about our adventures here.

When we arrived at the Park, I realized the property encompasses way more than “just a zoo.” There are over 400 acres to explore and plenty of year round activities to stay active both indoors and outside. Check out the full map here and the updated calendar here.

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